Tag Archives: sorghum

A Collection of Sorghum & Millet Information

If you need to get to know about Sorghum or Millet or want to get some of developments, this conference publication could be very useful.

Website presenting papers of the Afripro 2003 Conference

Unfortunately this conference is now 10 years old so doesn’t present the very latest state of the industry, but does contain two good reviews which are always relevant and some of the science of the time around food products, nutrition, plant breeding, sorghum based polymers and consumer preferences.

With international researchers like Professors Belton, Rooney and Taylor one can rest assured that the standard and focus of the work was of the highest standard. The web site presents a wide range of papers as well as the questions arising and the way forward through focus group and a prioritised list of research needs.

This conference was the output of a development funded project, so has no direct project follow up. However, there has surely been more work in the technology areas identified and maybe there were activities in ideas/groups born from the conference. I have not been able to find a collection of this type of information and would be interested to hear about your experiences and share further information here.

 

Sorghum Malting Technology Choice – Free Online Information

Here is a nice set of slides from a presentation on the technologies that can be used in the industrial malting of sorghum.

 click the image to visit the document online

Of course there is no detailed explanation in this presentation, but the photos and drawings are very good and illustrate well. You could also contact the author for more information.

Ethiopian Professor Wins 2009 World Food Prize

 

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from: Ethioplanet
(click image for full story online)

 

Dr. Ejeta’s work on the development of new sorghum varieties is a powerful demonstration of the difference agricultural research can make in creating a more secure and consistent food supply for millions of people,” Akridge said.

Sorghum is among the world’s five principle cereal grains. The crop is as important to Africa as corn and soybeans are to the United States.

A native of Ethiopia, Ejeta witnessed the devastating effects of drought and Striga on sorghum crops in his own country and several others in eastern and western Africa.

“I focused my research on sorghum because I’m originally from Africa, and I’ve known about the importance of the crop to the people there,” Etejta said. “So I wanted to work on improving sorghum.”