Tag Archives: indigenous fruit

Guide to Indigenous Fruit Processing – Free Technical Manual

This is one more of those amazing sources of information that the INTERNET provides for free. In the past if you were lucky enough to know about it you could probably request a copy. Now you GOOGLE and FTP a PDF for free!

 

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from: CPWild
(click image for full story online)

 

Interestingly the information in this manual is the same proven science and technology!

I know Chris Hansmann well, from having worked together on a Cashew Apple Processing project, through the South African Association of Food Scientists & Technologists (SAAFoST) and for having worked for sister R&D organisations. I am therefore confident of the soundness of the science as well as the applicability of the technology presented.

The manual is comprehensive, starting with some of the principles of preservation, moving into the different processes that are applicable (both from a process and a product viewpoint), covering hygiene and nutritional aspects and ending on recipes to be used with these processes.

This is a book you should put in your Technology Directory/Folder for the time you need some good technical information on fruit processing, whether it be for indigenous or other fruit.

 

Africa’s Indigenous Fruit

A report, by the National Research Council of America, the third in a series by the council called ‘Lost Crops of Africa’, appears to promote the domestication of the indigenous fruits of Africa as a solution to nutritional, environmental and economic needs!

Lost African fruits would benefit from technology, says report.jpg

 

I wonder how real this is? Many areas of Africa have abundant fruit, indigenous and other. But this only during the harvest, when in fact excesses develop because the production exceeds consumption. Fruit is of course much more perishable and more difficult to stabilise and store than cereals and tubers. This means that the household use of fruit is somewhat limited and that the industrial processing for conservation tends to be expensive.

To me this indicates that the opportunity is rather in the economic sector where products from Africa can address Western food and medicinal trends such as super fruits, natural products, herbal extracts etc

An example is the Marula tree, which has become the base of one massive (Amarula Cream) and one significant (marula oil in cosmetics) new industry in addition to the traditional industry (Marula Beer) but still hasn’t required domestication of the marula – possibly because there are sufficient wild trees or that there is an attemt to keep cash flowing to harvesters.

What do you think? The blog allows you to respond easily so please make your input.