Monthly Archives: October 2013

Membrane Filters – Free Online Information

Here is a link to another chapter from the Tetra Pak Dairy Processing Handbook, this time on membrane filters in dairy processing.

Tetrapak Dairy Processing Handbook Membrane Filters Dairy Processing Hand Book pdf

from: Tetra Pak
(click image for full story online)

Why not download the chapters that match your activities in food processing. Although these have a focus on dairy there is totally applicable information on heat exchangers, centrifugal separators, membrane separation, homogenizers and rheology.

Heat Excahangers – Free Online Information

In a previous post I said that equipment suppliers often supply useful technological information which is not necessarily tied to their equipment.

If you are looking for technical information on heat exchangers for the food industry here is a good place.

Extract from Tetrapak's Dairy Technology Book on heat exchangers.

click image to access the pdf

This gives you access to an impressive 15 page chapter from the Tetra Pak Dairy Processing Handbook covering uses of heat exchangers, pasteurisation, sterilisation, heat transfer mechanisms, design equations and equipment options.

The complete manual of 440 pages and 600 illustrations costs $80, but there appear to be quite a few free extracts (Tetra Pak has six on its page for the book) online which is in pdf format. Some educational institutions provide the manual free of charge for students.

Why not download the chapters that match your activities in food processing. Although these have a focus on dairy there is totally applicable information on heat exchangers, centrifugal separators, membrane separation, homogenizers and rheology.

Do Germans Spend 20 Times More Than Chadians on Food?

Hungry Planet, a recent book by Peter Menzel and Faith D’Aluisio, presents the food consumption of households around the world. The results are presented in the form of a picture of the family and the food they ate in a week, just like this German family.

click the image to visit the website

In each case the total cost of the food is given (in this case $500) as well as demographics of the country and some information on favorite foods. Besides just being interesting and revealing eg this German Family drinks 4 bottles of wine in the week while the French family appears to drink only one, it gives a view of food culture an food processing.

Revealing and concerning is the difference between first and third world countries and in particular, Central African countries. The family from Chad spends only $2,50 on food, just a 20th of the German Family!

click the image to visit the website

This is quite startling, although the environmental impact is probably even more interesting given the almost complete lack of processed food, besides post harvest processing, and one way packaging in the food of the Chadian family. While the German family shows that in a week they used around sixty glass, plastic and board beverage containers.

Not much scope for a Food Processor in Chad!

The answer to the question in the title is that we can’t tell from these single images. However, we can be sure that the general differences highlighted are an indication of the food culture differences. We also know from the research on waste, that a significant fraction of the food (maybe a quarter) shown in the German home is probably wasted, while very little of that reaching the Chadian household is.