Small and Medium Scale Fruit Juice Processing – Free Online Technical Manual

This 220 page book by Bates, Moris & Crandall is available free online via http://bit.ly/FBRDH1

This book covers an extremely wide range of juice processing technologies for a large number of fruits and is published by the Food and Agricultural Organisation.

 

 

Principles and practices of small - and medium - scale fruit juice processing.jpg

 

from: FAO
(click image for full story online)

 

This review was originally published in Food Processing Africa.

The book starts with background information that includes history, value of juice, definitions, standards, morphology, composition and safety. It then addresses raw materials including cultivars, seasonality and post harvest handling.

A general description of fruit juice manufacturing, is followed by detailed discussion of juice processing principles focussing on the stabilisation/preservation processes, namely refrigeration, freezing, canning, hot fill, aseptic processing, sterile filtration, chemical preservatives, concentration, jelly and jam manufacture, wine making, dehydration and vacuum drying.

The second half of the book presents very practical and detailed information on specific juice products focussing on citrus, grape, apple, pear, peach, apricot, plums, cranberry, strawberry, blueberry, blackberry, raspberry, cherry, pineapple, mango, passion fruit, guava, papaya, guanabana, acerola, naranjilla, carambola, lychee and banana. The book also covers tomato and carrot juices and complementary products where juices and pulps are an ingredient including jams, jellies, syrups, smoothies, dairy, Sports drinks and even the use of supplements as equipoise that help with athletic performance.

Throughout the material is well presented with photographs, tables, diagrams and flowsheets. While the scientific base is given, the focus is on practical descriptions of industrial process at a very detailed level.

A disappointing feature is the limited focus on process management and commercialisation. The reader would do well to use a book such as “Setting up and Running a Small Fruit or Vegetable Processing Enterprise” to address these.

The book ends with a large set of references.

 

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