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Africa Good

Using Food Science and Technology to Improve Nutrition and Promote National Development

This is an interesting and detailed paper presenting detailed information on the processing of traditional foods.

Chapter from an IUFOST publication

from: IUFOST
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The paper concludes that the existing small scale processing is important to food supply, food preservation and employment.

It finds that the expansion of the production of these traditional foods would make business sense, this has been hampered by the normal culprits – access to technology, poor management, lack of funding and low profit margins.

The paper presents information on the mechanization of gari, the production of instant yam flour and flakes and the production of traditional products including soy-ogi, dawadawa, kilishi and cheese.

The article has a detailed list of references.

Wara – Traditional Cheese of Nigeria

Timbuktu Chronicles describes this traditional cheese made from cows milk with a leaf extract from the Sodom Apple (Calotropis procera) tree. The leaf extract performs the coagulating role, normally played by rennet.

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Nyirefami Milling – Succesfful African Milling Business

Nyirefami Ltd is a really focussed Tanzanian milling company, which appears to succeed because of its focus.

Nine staple foods produced by Nyire

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Products are produced from pearl millet, finger millet, sorghum, plantain, maize and wheat and have a strong focus on nutrition.


The article by N Ackom and K Tano-Debrah in the latest edition of AJFAND Online presents a well explained and investigated process to produce a pineapple fibre for use in food formulations. The study at University of Ghana, Lagon was practical and produced fibre products that were used to produce muffins and biscuits which were acceptable to consumers. The corresponding author can be contacted at newusie@yahoo.co.uk.

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This process addresses the fourth level in the EPAs Food Recovery Heirachy, ie develop an industrial use for the waste food. The EPAs Food Recovery Heirachy puts feeding animals as third after reduce loss and feed people, the first 2.

Minnie’s Dried Fruit and Vegetables – African Business

Here is a nice story that shows how easy it is to establish an operating fruit and vegetable drying business.

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Menar Meebed of Egypt, has used a commercially available solar dryer and a simple Internet blog to set up a business selling dried fruit and vegetables. Her product is of a higher quality than the traditional products because of the fruit she selects and the fact that the solar dryer reduces the drying time.

The commercial success of the business of course depends on how well she sources her produce, whether the market demand for her product is big enough and how she manages the business but the basis is in place.


South African Government Pushing Investment in Agro-Processing!

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More information on this is available via a dti press release or by contacting Sidwell Medupe, dti Departmental Spokesperson, Tel: (012) 394 1650, Mobile: 079 492 1774, E-mail: MSMedupe@thedti.gov.za



Carbonated Soft Drinks – Franchise Opportunity.

Soda King seems to offer a fairly simple, sound and promising franchise.

Homepage of Soda King franchise

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They are reasonably new so there are many opportunities for entrepreneurs in Africa, although there is also Tanzanian franchise not shown on this map.

Soda King  Franchises

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If you are interested I suggest you contact them, leave the technology and equipment to them and focus on your local market and input suppliers.

Lost Crops of Africa – Fruits – Free Online Technical Manual

I posted some general thoughts on this book when it was published a few years ago. The other day I came across it again, on the USAID site as a free download, although its published by The National Academic Press . I felt it would be worthwhile reminding readers of the book and giving them the link to the download.

Http pdf usaid gov pdf docs PNADS877 pdf

from: USAID
(click image for full story online)

The book covers cultivated and wild fruits in two parts. Each part presents general information on the fruits’s potential role in addressing issues such as Malnutrition, Food Security, Rural Development and Sustainable Landcare. The part on Wild Fruit also covers particular issues such as
Increasing Wild Fruit Usage, Developing Wild Fruits, Nutrition, Sustainable Forestry and Social Difficulties.

Both parts then cover a large number of fruits separately and in detail.

The cultivated fruit section covers Balanites (Balanites aegyptiaca), Baobab (Adansonia digitata), Butterfruit (Dacryodes edulis), Carissa (Carissa species), Horned Melon (Cucumis metulifer), Kei Apple (Dovyalis caffra), Marula (Sclerocarya birrea), Melon(Cucumis melo), Tamarind (Tamarindus indica) and Watermelon (Citrullus lanatus).

While the wild fruits include Aizen, Chocolate Berries, Custard Apples, Ebony, Gingerbread Plums, Gumvines, Icacina, Imbe (Garcinia livingstonii). Medlars, Monkey Oranges, Star Apples, Sugarplum, Sweet Detar (Detarium senegalense) and Tree Grapes.

Each fruit is covered in detail with abundant drawing and photographs and information on all aspects from cultivation to utilisation.

This is an amazing resource which an enormous amount of detail.

Mediterranean Delicacies – African Food Company

This started out as a real one man enterprise launched by a Greek in South Africa who saw that speciality Greek foods were difficult to come by.

Mediterranean Delicacies  Dips

from: Mediterranean Delicacies
(click image for full story online)

The story is reported in detail in Fin24.

Mediterranean Delicasies is a business born out of necessity. Thirty years ago, Tony Nichas was working in the chemical business. He was Greek and, by default, loved to cook.

The problem was that in the 1990s SA was in the grip of severe trade sanctions and many Greek ingredients were virtually impossible to come by in supermarkets.

Mediterranean Delicacies was born in Nichas’ kitchen in 1988. It started out supplying just one ingredient to catering companies and restaurants in the Western Cape: tarama – the fish roe used as a base for the oily dip taramasalata, almost always part of Greek meze spreads.

Since then they have grown and expanded geographically, business content and sector wise – read the whole story on line!

The Vastness of Africa – Single Screenshot Series

Comparrison of The Area of large States to Africa.

from: MEDIAite
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